Susan McKeown

facebook twitter
Rock - General | New York, United States
Total Song Plays: 1,768   
Member Since: 2009
   Last Login: over 30 days ago

Profile    Songs    Comments    Bios    Endorsements   

Sign up for Broadjam today to follow Susan McKeown, and be notified when they upload new stuff or update their news!

Plays: 30
Play Song
Add To Playlist
Plays: 30
Play Song
Add To Playlist
Plays: 15
Play Song
Add To Playlist
Plays: 21
Play Song
Add To Playlist
Plays: 10
Play Song
Add To Playlist
Plays: 29
Play Song
Add To Playlist
Plays: 19
Play Song
Add To Playlist
Plays: 16
Play Song
Add To Playlist
Plays: 7
Play Song
Add To Playlist
Plays: 25
Play Song
Add To Playlist
Plays: 48
Play Song
Add To Playlist
Plays: 287
Play Song
Add To Playlist
Plays: 80
Play Song
Add To Playlist
Plays: 76
Play Song
Add To Playlist
Plays: 40
Play Song
Add To Playlist
Plays: 60
Play Song
Add To Playlist
Plays: 65
Play Song
Add To Playlist
Plays: 51
Play Song
Add To Playlist
Plays: 47
Play Song
Add To Playlist
Plays: 70
Play Song
Add To Playlist
Plays:

742

Song Description

Death is personified as a gentleman caller or suitor. But exactly what kind of person is he? * Is Death a kind, polite suitor? The speaker refers to his "kindness" and "civility." He drives her slowly; is this an expression of tact and consideration for her? If he is the courteous suitor, then Immortality, who is also in the carriage (or hearse) would be their chaperon, a silent one. * Is Death actually a betrayer, and is his courtly manner an illusion to seduce her? Because of his kindness in stopping for her, she agrees to go with him ("put away / My labor and my leisure too"). Is Death really cruel? She is not properly dressed for their journey; she is wearing only a gossamer gown and tulle tippet (gossamer: very light, thin cloth; tulle: a thin, fine netting used for veils, scarfs, etc.; tippet: covering for the shoulders). Is Immortality really an accomplice to Death's deception? The drive symbolizes her leaving life. She progresses from childhood, maturity (the "gazing grain" is ripe) and the setting (dying) sun to her grave. The children are presented as active in their leisure ("strove"). The images of children and grain suggest futurity, that is, they have a future; they also depict the progress of human life. Is there irony in the contrast between her passivity and inactivity in the coach and their energetic activity?

Playlists this song is on:
Playlist CreatorPlaylist NameDate Added Reverse Sorted
Lyrics

Because I could not stop for Death,
He kindly stopped for me;
The carriage held but just ourselves
And Immortality.

We slowly drove, he knew no haste,
And I had put away
My labor, and my leisure too,
For his civility.

We passed the school, where children played
Their lessons scarcely done
We passed the fields of gazing grain,
We passed the setting sun.

We paused before a house that seemed
A swelling of the ground;
The roof was scarcely visible,
The cornice but a mound.

Since then 'tis centuries, but each
Feels shorter than the day
I first surmised the horses' heads
Were toward eternity.

Song Length
3:53
Genres
Rock - General, World - Celtic
Tempo / Feel
Medium Slow (91 - 110)
Lead Vocal
Duet Female
Moods
Peaceful, Composed

Subject Matter
Life, Darkness

Similar Artists
Natalie Merchant, Indigo Girls
Language
English
Era
2000 and later

Lyric Credits Emily Dickinson
Music Credits Susan McKeown
Producer Credits Susan McKeown, Jon Spurney
Publisher Credits Sheila-na-Gig Music (IMRO)
Performance Credits Susan McKeown and the Chanting House
Label Credits SNG Music