Foley Road

Foley Road

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World - Celtic | Cincinnati, Ohio, United States
Total Song Plays: 1,558   
Member Since: 2007
   Last Login: 10/19/2017

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Plays:

31

Song Description

Wanted to contribute our part to what is probably the most recognizable of all Irish songs. Have to know this one if you are going to play anything Irish.

Story Behind the Song

"Danny Boy" was written by Frederick Weatherly in 1910. Although the lyrics were originally written for a different tune, Weatherly's sister modified them to fit "Londonderry Air" in 1913 when Weatherly sent her copy. Ernestine Schumann-Heink made the first recording in 1915. Weatherly gave the song to the vocalist Elsie Griffin, who in turn made it one of the most popular songs in the new century. In 1928, Weatherly suggested that the second verse would provide a fitting requiem for the actress Ellen Terry. "Danny Boy" was intended as a message from a woman to a man, and Weatherly provided the alternative "Eily dear" for male singers in his 1918 authorised lyrics.[1] However, the song is actually sung by men as much as, or possibly more than, women. The song has been interpreted by some listeners as a message from a parent to a son going off to war or leaving as part of the Irish diaspora. Some interpret it differently,[who?] such a dying father speaking to his leaving Danny. The phrase, "the pipes, the pipes are calling", in this interpretation, could refer to the traditional funeral instrument. The song is widely considered an Irish anthem, although Weatherly was an Englishman and was living in America at the time he composed it. Nonetheless, "Danny Boy" is considered by many Irish Americans and Irish Canadians to be their unofficial signature song.

Lyrics

Oh Danny boy, the pipes, the pipes are calling
From glen to glen, and down the mountain side
The summer's gone, and all the flowers are dying
'Tis you, 'tis you must go and I must bide.
But come ye back when summer's in the meadow
Or when the valley's hushed and white with snow
'Tis I'll be here in sunshine or in shadow
Oh Danny boy, oh Danny boy, I love you so.

And if you come, when all the flowers are dying
And I am dead, as dead I well may be
You'll come and find the place where I am lying
And kneel and say an "Ave" there for me.

And I shall hear, tho' soft you tread above me
And all my dreams will warm and sweeter be
If you'll not fail to tell me that you love me
I'll simply sleep in peace until you come to me.

I'll simply sleep in peace until you come to me.

Song Length
5:15
Genres
World - Celtic, Folk - Traditional
Tempo / Feel
Medium Slow (91 - 110)
Lead Vocal
Female Vocal
Moods
Composed, Poignant

Subject Matter
Relationship, Sadness


Language
English
Era
1900 - 1920

Lyric Credits Frederick Weatherly
Producer Credits Foley Road
Publisher Credits Foley Road
Performance Credits Foley Road
Label Credits Foley Road