Ritt Deitz

Ritt Deitz

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Folk - Rock | Madison, Wisconsin, United States
Total Song Plays: 415   
Member Since: 2007
   Last Login: over 30 days ago
   Sounds Like: Greg Brown, Richard Thompson

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small blue green letters

2015

Small Blue Green Letters, Ritt's latest recording and his fifth on the Uvulittle label, marks Deitz's return to stringed instruments and voices and...

Upstream

Ritt Deitz releases his fifth full-length CD of original and traditional songs, Upstream, on Uvulittle Records. Ritt spent the winter in the studio...

AFTER THE MOUNTAINS

AFTER THE MOUNTAINS is Ritt's latest batch of beautiful, straight-ahead songs.

This is solid acoustic roots rock.

The...

small blue green letters

2015

Folk - Traditional

Small Blue Green Letters, Ritt's latest recording and his fifth on the Uvulittle label, marks Deitz's return to stringed instruments and voices and recalls his first full-length release, Hillbilly (Bentback 1999, anthologized on the 2006 Uvulittle release Collected 1999-2000), exchanging Steve Burke's mandolin for Deitz's banjo and with the harmonies of backing vocalist Lindsey Hinkel Craig Totten's dobro work. The small-town feel one often hears in Deitz's songs shines through. A native of Florence, Kentucky, Deitz lives in a tightly-knit block on the Near East Side of Madison, Wisconsin, which a musician neighbor (who grew up a block from where Deitz lived as a child) has called "Mayberry." You can hear both of these on the opening track, "Here Comes the Band." "A float goes by, the FFA / has filled that thing all up with hay / it must have taken them the whole darn day / but I ain't sure I care / Where's the band?" The songs hang together like communities do in small towns, neighborhoods, even workplaces. Deitz writes like a man aware of the forces of Big Data, of consumerism, of individualism, of the have-a-nice-day shallowness that seems to define, ever quickly, what it means to be happy in America. "I know we have these things to contend with," says Deitz (whose songs the Onion once called "well-wrought"), "but we do have these thoughts, these lives, and each other." The songs move from lighter and melodic ("Here Comes the Band," "Bike") to heady ballad-like tunes ("Chicago" or the album's only cover, a very acoustic version of Yazoo's 1980s synth hit, "Only You") and back again. The only percussion on this record, as was the case on Hillbilly, comes from Joe Meisel's thumping bass (or regular collaborator Dave Foss's hammered dulcimer, which, as Foss regularly reminds Meisel, is also a percussion instrument). The record's last tune, the old-fashioned waltz "My Rare One" (about a couple who meets and grows old by a river), gives the lyrics-oriented l

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